Phased approach

Future Community Lunch in the Nave

Future Community Lunch in the Nave

Holy Trinity’s amazing development will happen in meticulously planned phases. Phasing enables the complicated process of gaining the necessary permissions to proceed smoothly whilst work on approved work continues, and allows fundraising to be completed one phase at a time.

The first phase, the external works, now underway, will make a huge  difference. Trinity Square will be a fabulous open space, suitable for concerts, outdoor markets, and all kinds of cultural events. With permissions and the required funds in place, it’s all systems go now, to complete this work in 2016. 

The next target is to gain permissions for Phase 2, and to raise the necessary funds to complete it. 

Phase 2 really will be the backbone of the project, as it will create the space in the nave to do so much that can’t currently be accommodated. However, Holy Trinity’s famed pew ends, and all of the nave’s history and heritage will be protected, with pews mounted on wheels. This will allow them to be placed in the nave, or in the North Choir Aisle, or indeed any other location within the church as needed.” Phase 3, which will happen after 2017’s City of Culture events, will provide a new, external kitchen, and fabulous new café by the West door, new toilets and the refurbishment of the east end of the church. We are already talking to outside agencies about financial support for this phase.

Phase 2 will provide space for concerts, banquets, events and performances, a flexible worship space, a reordered, restored nave that welcomes the visitor, and an upgraded café in the south choir aisle. 

A fabulous glass entrance will help transform the church. Not only will it keep the heat in and the cold out, but imagine standing in Trinity Square and  looking right through the church to see the amazing east window. Then, come through the glass doors to see the fabulous medieval architecture as never before. Breathtaking!

“Holy Trinity is about serving our community, whether that means being a cultural centre, an artistic and heritage hub, or a place where those in need know that they will find people who care,” explains Rev Canon  Dr Neal Barnes. “At present, we’re growing in every way – we’re helping more people, staging more events, and in three years our Sunday  attendance has grown three-fold. But we are restricted by our facilities. That’s why Phase 2 is so very important.”

Whilst planning continues, the race is also on to secure the £800,000 needed to complete Phase 2 on time for City of Culture.

“We’ve been delighted by the generosity of people so far,” says Development Group Chairman John Robinson. “That’s why we’re able to complete the external works, and are over half way to our target for Phase 2. I know people will be just as generous again, especially when they can see what’s happening in the square. We need everybody who recognises the difference this work will make for the city and its people to give as generously as they can. And I know they will.”